Images of Mars

Named after the roman god of war. Mars is the smaller brother of earth. With its size being approximately half that of the earth its gravity is only capable of maintaining a thin atmosphere made up almost entirley (95 %) of carbon dioxide.

Since the 1960 Mars has been visited by a number of spacecrafts and landers. This gallery features some interesting images from those missions.

A Dust Devil on Mars (Featured as APOD) A Recent Impact in Elysium Planitia (Mars)

Caption from the APOD webpage: It was late in the northern martian spring when the HiRISE camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spied this local denizen. Tracking across the flat, dust-covered Amazonis Planitia in 2012, the core of this whirling dust devil is about 140 meters in diameter. Lofting dust into the thin martian atmosphere, its plume reaches about 20 kilometers above the surface. (read more)

A Recent Impact in Elysium Planitia (Mars) A Recent Impact in Elysium Planitia (Mars)

A Recent Impact in Elysium Planitia (Mars). The crater is the result of an impact that happened between February 2012 and June 2014. What looks like burn marks is in fact darker material that was ejected on impact.

  • Misson: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)
  • Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona (Image Source)
A Spectacular New Impact Crater and Its Ejecta A Spectacular New Impact Crater and Its Ejecta (Mars)

Original Caption Released with the image: This image shows a large, rayed blast zone and far-flung secondary material around an approximately 30 meter-diameter crater, indicating a large explosion threw debris as far as 15 kilometers in distance. Because the terrain where the crater formed is dusty, the fresh crater appears blue in the enhanced color due to the lack of reddish dust

Carbon Dioxide Ice in the Late Summer Carbon Dioxide Ice in the Late Summer

Carbon Ice caps near the south pole of mars.

A Giant Cave on a Giant Volcano Hole at the bottom of the crater of Pavonis Mons

A cave with approximately 35 m diameter at the bottom of the crater of Pavonis Mons. Structures like these form when lava solidifies on top but keeps flowing underneath their solid crust. These rivers of lava can drain away leaving the solidified portion of the tube empty. (based on the original description from Shane Byrne as listed in the wikipedia)

Original Caption: Mars Crater Ice Mars Crater Ice

The European Space Agency's (ESA's) Mars Express obtained this view of an unnamed impact crater located on Vastitas Borealis, a broad plain that covers much of Mars's far northern latitudes. The circular patch of bright material located at the center of the crater is residual water ice. The colors are very close to natural, but the vertical relief of the topography is exaggerated three times.

Glimpse of 'Bagnold Dunes' Edging Mount Sharp Mars Crater Ice

The dark band in the lower portion of this Martian scene is part of the "Bagnold Dunes" dune field lining the northwestern edge of Mount Sharp, inside Gale Crater. The view combines multiple images taken with the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover on Sept. 25, 2015, during the 1,115th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars. (read more)

Curiosity Self-Portrait at 'Murray Buttes' Mars Crater Ice

This self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle at the "Quela" drilling location in the "Murray Buttes" area on lower Mount Sharp. (read more) Explanation how the image was made

Bright Layered Deposits with Clues of Acidic Water Mars Crater Ice

This view shows color variations in bright layered deposits on a plateau near Juventae Chasma in the Valles Marineris region of Mars. A brown mantle covers portions of the bright deposits. The view covers an area about 1.2 kilometers (three-fourths of a mile) across. (read more)

  • Misson: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) 
  • Spacecraft: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) 
  • Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona (Original Page, Full-Res Jpeg Image Link)